19 September 2016

A Brief History Of Long Branch Road Rush, KY

@ Teresa Martin Klaiber
2016



This article was created for the 2nd Annual Long Branch Road Reunion located on Garner, Rush, Boyd County, KY



The history of our hollow has been home to families for over 275 years. Prior to the formation of either Carter County in 1838 and Boyd County, in 1860, recognizable family surnames begin to appear on what we now know as Long Branch Road.  Our “long” road still encompasses two counties.

Our well established cemeteries, alone, whisper of the history of the people who have helped build our neighborhood.  The earliest two known graves on our road are both children buried in different cemeteries in 1853.  The first is John Milton Banfield less than one month old and buried in Banfield cemetery in July 1853. The Banfield cemetery is on property owned by the Parker family in 2016. The 2nd  grave is James Calvin Clark, two months old in October of the same year, in Selbee Cemetery, which follows the same ridge line.  Between them stood the first known location of Greenhill Lodge where yet another child by the surname of Pence was buried in 1882.  Both Greenhill and Selbee are on property owned by the Leslie Blanton family today.  Other cemeteries read like a “who’s who” along the road as well. Beginning at the mouth and overlooking our road, the first known burial in Allan Prichard Cemetery is for Mary E. Prichard in 1873 (owned by Childers today).  Klaiber Cemetery aka Sexton Cemetery contains the early graves for the Hood and Howe wives of pioneer settlers when we were still Greenup County, followed by the Mayhew and Sexton families.  Our newest cemetery moving up the road is for the Tolliver family.   The last cemetery, following our road, is the burial place of “the McWhorter sisters,” Elizabeth and America, who lived modestly stringing their own leather britches and lay to rest on a hill on today’s Stewart property. Many of our pioneers lay in unmarked graves including those who called our road home at the county poor house (Parker property 2016).

Our portion of the county was originally part of the Richard Graham survey.  A massive amount of 70,000 acres later sold to our pioneers. Kentucky Legislature enacted its first road laws in 1797. Surveyors were appointed by the courts, and learned the task from each other.   An early map of Carter County filed at the state archives shows the mouth of our road at Garner Creek but does not continue up our hollow.  All males, sixteen years old or more, were required to work the roads (with exceptions of owners with slaves or those with disabilities approved by court).  Males were fined for every day absent from the work.  Mitchell Clark is cited as a chain carrier prior to the formation of Boyd County (died 1892, Klaiber Cem.).   The newly established court in Boyd County appointed Hiram Gallion to view a road “from the forks of Garner Creek to the Carter line in December 1865.  Hiram, buried in Klaiber cemetery, was the son of Thomas Gallion aka Sexton.  This was the first court order concerning the development of our road. The 1865 survey would follow the creek into Carter County.  The path to Denton by mule would continue thru woods and by trail.

Hoods, Howe’s, Banfield and Ross already had large land holdings along the creek. The Geological Survey of 1856 talks about ore beds being one hundred and five feet “higher” in the hills. It does not talk about the distance or the many farms that were tapped for the ore. According to the Survey Sandy Furnace on Bolt’s Fork was producing seven tons of iron in twenty-four hours.  James and Sarah Hood Howe watched as ore was taken from the ridge of their property and hauled over the hill.  Today you can still see the ore trenches along the ridge above Klaiber Cemetery.

          This author believes that the first school house was at Green Hill (Greenhill) on what we now know as Long Branch.  Farmers would collect enough funds to pay teachers in subscription schools.  In December 1869 Chrisley Banfield, among others, agreed to the terms of one James W. Mullan (as spelled) to teach a subscription school.  The one room Long Branch School would be established later on a lot of land that George W. Ross sold to H. P. Sexton in 1885.   The school was nestled at the edge of the then Mayhew property (left of Klaiber home drive and corner to Wright’s 2016).  Mae Harris Bryant (daughter of J. H. & Susan Eva Mayhew Harris) wrote a letter in 1957 stating “…I watched them move the Long Branch School house…” to what is now Robert and Jean Fannin’s property.  Teacher’s, at Long Branch School, from 1912 through 1957, when Garner School opened, include: Willa Ross, Mary and Amanda Burke, Edna Hatfield, Clarice Skaggs, Homer Pope, Pauline Davis, Dorothy Selbee, Gladys Manning, Elsie Klaiber and Elizabeth Miller.

An early building stood at the mouth of our road referenced as “McCormack Meeting House” (not to be confused with one of the same name at Summit) in court orders in the mid 1860’s.  As late as 1916 Martha Cox remembers walking or riding a mule down to pick up mail prior to home delivery.

The 1860’s were turbulent. Able bodied males were required to join the county militia and by 1863 they were required to sign the US Civil War Draft Registration.  Among familiar names are William Howe, H. P. Sexton, C. P. Banfield, George W. Ross, William Mayhew and other members of their respective families. 

In 1866 James W. Howe became the guardian of Isabelle Stewart daughter of Allen Stewart.  James had married Sarah Davidson Stewart (husband Henry Stewart) in October 1865 at William Hood’s house.  Shadrach Estep was the minister.  Probably not the first wedding on our creek, but one of the first distinguishable in our neighborhood. This little home sat on the edge of today’s Eastern Kentucky Development Company, about ½ mile up a deserted haul road between Pierzala and Klaiber’s.  In the 1940’s/50’s a sawmill was still working in that hollow. 

By 1870 families began to expand along our road.  In the 1860’s Phillip Howe moved into the one room log structure known today as 22937 Long Branch. It still stands. In 1899 the Jasper Sexton family moved into the cabin & Bonnie Sexton Moore’s mother Willa Mae was born there in 1902.  For a short while the Hazlett family lived in the cabin followed by the Jordans until 1944. 

Other names that we are still familiar with today begin to appear in the ‘70’s.  Henry Kane Lucas, great grandfather of Garner Lucas (1949-2008) settled on the creek.  James McWhorter, who served in the Civil War, married Margaret Davis in 1866 and moved with infants Elizabeth and America, on land on the left fork building a two story home that stood until just a few years ago. Pleasant Burke’s family lived in the large home for some time and for a few years in the 1970’s Earl and Mary Susan Warren Sexton occupied the house. 

The aftermath of the Civil War lingered well into the 1880’s.  Fraternal societies and granges began to form.  The Mutual Protection Society was formed.  Regulators roamed to “police” our area.  Among members of the MPS from our road I found: Nelson Sexton, Sherman Lucas, John Higgins, John Mayhew, John A. Klaiber, L. D. Sexton, W. T. Hood and many others from surrounding areas.

Chrisley Perry Banfield was appointed commissioner to purchase 118 acres from William Lewis Geiger for the poor in 1870 “on a fork of Garner Creek”.  Our road still had no name.  John Higgins was appointed the first superintendent. There were several superintendent changes during the 70’s including John D. Ross and James Leslie.  In the late 1870’s a fire destroyed the buildings.  At the time 62 “inmates” resided at the poor house (located where Parker’s home is in 2016).  A new two story log structure was built.  The home was almost identical to the Sexton home that stood for many years where the Blair family reside in 2016.  Among those who worked on construction of the home and out buildings were William Banfield, German immigrant John Andrew Klaiber, and William J. Ross.  The home had many residents over the years including at least one Civil War veteran, William Ball.  In 1909 the Poor House Farm was sold to Burns Banfield.  The residents were loaded on wagons and taken across the hill to Rush Station. The AC&I train picked them up and took them to the new county home located at Winslow. 

A group known as the Fish and Game Association had a few meetings in the building after the Poor House closed.  And in October 1930 the “Traipsin Woman” Jean Thomas, hosted the first festival in the house, though she advertised it as on the Mayo Trail.  Dorothy Gordon was the guest singer from New York as well as Jilson Setters.  The Governor of Kentucky was there as well as the Banfield children.
 
The records begin to reflect that residents on this branch of Garner live on “Poor House Road” in late 1879 and 1880.  In 1880 William Selbee was 15 and living with the Banfield family.  He would later marry and purchase property on the road.  Joseph Marcum, appointed blacksmith for the poor house, resided in what is now known as Marcum Holler (between the J. D. Klaiber and A. K. Blanton farm in 2016).  An early haul road up Marcum Holler crossed over to Bolt’s Fork and may have been how the ore was taken to Bolt’s Fork.

The 1880’s had “local reporters” who would send in community news to the Independent.  Sexton’s were making 1000 gallons of molasses at a new mill on the road in 1883.  In November of 1883 the paper reported “We are told that three barrels of molasses went down Garner the other day, in the time of high water.”

In the spring of 1882 typhoid fever was prevalent and raged into 1883.  The Independent reported that Dow Sexton was recovering from an attack of typhoid and pneumonia fever in June 1883. Not all things were gloomy in the 1880’s.  Wiser and Maggie Crum were married in 1887. Wiser had recovered from a terrible scalding on Williams Creek in 1882, while blowing out a valve he was firing at Clere’s sawmill.  The neighborhood had a “belling.”    The wedding was a huge community event. The young couple were treated to cow bells and a barrage of loud noise on their wedding night.   In December Crum was elected into the Mutual Aide Society aka MPS.

By the 1900’s James M. Klaiber had established a blacksmith business.  The blacksmith shop sat near a branch that flows into Long Branch on the right side of the lane leading to a rock quarry on the Reffitt/Blair property (behind and back left corner of barn (2016).   He kept up his tools and techniques through a subscription to American Blacksmith during the 1900’s. His desk was made from an old crate with drawers designed from cigar boxes. The shop was made from board sawed on the farm. His anvil was similar to a London Anvil mounted on a log stump. With the development of modern equipment, he was able to have a rotary blower. A ledger is in possession of the family.

The rock quarry was developed on the Sexton farm and many chimney and foundation stones were utilized up and down the road.  During the era of WPA a rock crusher was used to improve the road. Lon Boggs, living on the road in 1940 is listed as working as a machinist with the WPA. The quarry was leased to the county as late as 1946 for “crushing and ballast for county and state roads and to build tool buildings…”

The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 allowed Kentucky farmers to grow hemp.  Hemp was grown in the field across from where Blair’s built their new home (2016).  The first and second annual Long Branch Reunion are held in this field today. By 1940 Federal Census continues to call the road “Poor House”.  It starts at the mouth with the surname Bolt and including families of Workman, Smith, Alexander, Click, Jones, Jenkins, Stewart, and others thus ending with McCormack (head of the hollow). Many are marked as renting.

In 1939 William Albert Brown (son of Thomas Brown and Olivia McGlothlin), a Spanish War (1898) Veteran was laid to rest in what is now marked distinctly as Banfield Cemetery. His death certificate states he was buried in Greenhill which is over the fence but on the same ridge. Brown married several times including into the Stewart and Mayhew family.  It is not clear if he actually resided on our road – at least until his death.

Gas and oil leases were and are popular and active along our road.  In 1938 Landon Klaiber, who had handled explosives while working for Ben Williamson applied for a license for Klaiber Explosives Company.  The business address was Ashland but the explosive material must be made and stored elsewhere. “…nature is buying and selling of wholesale and retail dynamites, powder, gelatin and other high explosives of all kinds and makes including blasting supplies used in connection with said explosives and with hauling and transporting of said explosives …likewise the preparation of explosives for purpose of shooting and exploding same in gas and oil wells, mined and other places…” Klaiber and the Weddington sisters, who were also partners, built a facility on the edge of the property where his father lived on Long Branch.  Today the hollow stands behind where the 2016 Long Branch Reunion is held and is still called “Powder House Holler.”

Hunters are rarely discouraged.  The game association continued meeting after vacating the poor house. Their next cabin was on the cliff across a swinging bridge on what was the Dowdy property.  The hunters named it Camp Schroeder.  At the time they were members of the Eastern Kentucky Coon Hunters Association.  They hunted mostly squirrel and never saw any deer. Because it was hard to access, about 1944, they rented property to the right going up Klaiber Cemetery hill.  Art Damron, (who worked for Glenn Judd, father of “the Judd’s”) bought two box cars and hauled them from Ashland.  They had a porch, an old gas stove and they had the creek for a swimming hole. One box car survived well into the millennium.  In just a few years (1947/8) they moved once again “up the road” and leased from Frank Stewart, for 99 years, for $15.00 and a milk cow.  They had a block machine at Pollard and when one of the members was available would make each block by hand and haul them out.  The Ashland Women’s Club had several “adventures” and had their lunches in the building.  Among the last members was Roy Rice. They tried to revamp the building but it was vandalized and Rice’s son cut and lost use of his arm on a window. These little camps were the forerunners of what is now the Blue Ribbon Fox Hunter’s Association in another area of the county.    The last building on Long Branch still stands on the right of the lane going to Keith Blanton’s home.

The box car clubhouse was rented to Rosa Sammons family for a short time after the hunters moved up the road.  She drew her fresh water from the spring which is still crystal clear in 2016.

In 1950 there were seventy-three dairies in Boyd County.  The mid-fifties changed federal/state health department regulations and production standards. Today you can still see the milk houses left standing on our road.  The bulk truck rumbled, daily, down our road. Compton (Tom & Claudia), Dowdy’s (Thomas &  Sarah), Diamond (Ova & Dovey) and Klaiber (J.H. & Elsie) all had small milking operations at one time. The largest and last milking operation to withstand and improve their milking equipment and barns was Klaiber’s. Most farms along the road raised beef cattle.  From the beginning of the county in 1860 farmers were taxed by the hoof for horses/mules, hogs, cattle and sheep (apparently goats were not worth counting even in those days!).  Tax records show most of the farmers had a few sheep on their properties.

The fifties health regulation requirements included cattle to be tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis (Bangs Disease).  Hydrophobia was also a huge problem and rabies clinics were set up. When a case of rabies was diagnosed, the local health department was required to quarantine the area for a month. The new regulations were a few years too late for the Jones family.   Four-teen year old Charles Jones was out hunting rabbits (they lived in Ashland at the time but had ties on the road) and was dog bitten in late November 1942.  He suffered until January of ’43.  There were no measles vaccines during this time either.  Arthur Jones, just two years old, died in Ashland from the disease in 1944 and once again the family brought another child out for burial.  They, along with other children including Lottie, were children of John and Goldie (Walker) Jones.  Lottie married Norman Lucas, grandson of Henry Kane Lucas.  In January 1967 a case involving a fox on Garner, Route #1 caused two children to have the anti-rabies series.  The fox attacked several cattle and two or three dogs.

When the county began to make improvements to the road in 1955, including rerouting of portions of the creek, right-of-way deeds still included the words “Poor House Branch”. The Tennessee Gas Transmission Company began running lines across several of our properties in 1957. 

We were not the first to get amenities such as electricity, telephones or county sewers.  We do qualify for having one of the last party lines in the county.  Outhouses are a novelty now. Neighbors still get a good laugh from pranks. In the 60’s at least one outhouse was placed in the middle of the road during Halloween.

 Hunting season is still an important ritual.  In the fifties the hills were full of grouse and quail. They are all but gone today.  Turkey had been hunted to extinction by our pioneer families, in our hills, and you never saw a deer.  Deer slowly began to repopulate in the 1970’s and by the 1990’s we all began to see turkey in our fields.

Compton, heirs of Tom, began to subdivide their property in the 1990’s and a new road was created off Long Branch, called Deer Creek Estates.  In May 1998 the family defaulted and the surveyed lots were sold at auction by Brooks Wells.

As time pushes each day into history there are still weddings on the road. In 2012 The Tuzik- Pierzala wedding took place in the field in what was known as the Elisha “Lige” Sexton inheritance until the 1930’s. Other families have lived near the cliffs of that lane including Stapleton and Workman.  In 2014 the lane finally was properly named “Walnut Grove Lane.”

     The road has always flooded and residents know how to time getting in and out. In 1880 H. P. Sexton wrote on May 2nd “Dear son, I got myself to answer your kind letter…hale storm the 24 day of April. Very high water…” Christmas Day 2015 was the first winter flood that our generation can remember.  We were hit with one of the worst floods preceded by a hail storm this year.  Most homes on the road had to have replacement roofs. Lanes eroded and Stewart’s bridge was severely damaged. Flood waters entered the Vanover residence causing severe damage.  “God willin’ and the creek don’t rise” our community will continue to thrive for another two hundred seventy-five years.





 





 Bibliography

Bryant, Mae Harris, Letter addressed to Julina Sexton Klaiber. Worthington, OH. 1956. Klaiber Cemetery Record Book.
Census of the United States, (National Archives Microfilm Publication); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Cox, Martha, Oral Interview, Catlettsburg, KY. 1998.
Hill, George Anna Banfield, Oral Interview. 2000.
Independent The (Ashland), newspaper, various microfilm, University of Kentucky microfilm division.
Kentucky, Boyd County Cemetery Database, Boyd County Library, http://db.thebookplace.org/search/boyd.htm, accessed 2016
Kentucky, Boyd County, Court Orders, LDS 0344012
Kentucky, Boyd County, Incorporation Book 7 page 271.

Kentucky, Boyd County, Deeds, Courthouse, Catlettsburg, KY
Kentucky, Boyd County, Tax Records, Microfilm AGLL V20-0034, 1860-1875.
Kentucky, Carter County Court Orders, courthouse, Grayson, KY
KY, Carter County, Tax Records, AGLL microfilm V20-0067. 1839-1864.
James Matthew Klaiber Blacksmith Ledger 1902-1906 Garner, Boyd County, KY. 1st edition 1999
 Klaiber, John Henry, Oral Interview. 1987.
Klaiber, Teresa Martin, editor. James Matthew Klaiber Blacksmith Ledger 1902-1906 Garner, Boyd County, KY. 1st edition 1999
Klaiber, Teresa Martin, Eastern Kentucky Genealogy, Google Blog, http://easternkentuckygenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/03/mutual-aide-regulators-part-1.html , Mutual Aide & Regulators, 2011.
Klaiber, Teresa Martin, Eastern Kentucky Genealogy, Google Blog http://easternkentuckygenealogy.blogspot.com/2010/06/sandy-furnace-and-its-people.html, Sandy Furnace and Its People, 2010.
Klaiber, Teresa Martin, Eastern Kentucky Genealogy, google Blog http://easternkentuckygenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/05/saving-voices.html, Saving Voices. Elsie Rucker Klaiber interview, 1978. 2011.
Klaiber, Teresa Martin, Boyd County, Kentucky Monographs I, 2004.
Klaiber, Teresa Martin, Boyd County, Kentucky Monographs II 2006, pp.146
Martin, John Never a Ho Hum Day, Guild Press of Indiana, 1998.
Owen, David D. (principal Geologist) Report of the Geological Survey in Kentucky…year 1856, State Printer Frankfort, KY
Rice, Roy; oral interview and correspondence, 1990- 1995.
Sammons, Rosa; oral interview 2005
Sexton, Henry Powell. Letter to M. L. Sexton. 2 May 1880. Teresa Martin Klaiber collection.
Wolfford, George. Carter County a pictorial history. WWW Company, Ashland, KY. 1985.





 

10 October 2015

FAMILY HEIRLOOMS HAVE VALUE - MEMORIES ARE PRICELESS

Over the years we have attended many auctions.  Nothing tugs at my heart more than to see family members ruthlessly bidding against each other to purchase a treasured item at an estate sale.  In the heat of the moment it is often hard to remember that it is the memories attached to the item and not the item itself that we are clinging unto. 

Not all cherished items are antique or expensive.  In fact the most cherished keepsakes are often tattered, chipped and worn.  We have been married 47 years. Memories of my wedding and wedding showers flood back this week. 

The house in Catlettsburg, where my husband's aunts honored our marriage with a shower is now gone. Presents were deposited each gaily wrapped.  I could not help but notice that one present was wrapped in wrinkled paper and no bow.  The ladies would rearrange and kept tucking this package behind the more elegant gifts on display.

Finally the last present was handed to me.  I opened 4 pressed glasses, chipped and worn little dessert bowls.  Julina Sexton Horton Klaiber beamed and said "them is desert dishes" and went on to explain that she had used them many years and wanted us to have them. Julina was 91 years young that day.  I cherish them and use them every year especially during the holiday and smile each time I look at them.  No typographical error this lovely little lady called them desert dishes which makes me think of tropical sandy paradises that she never laid eyes on.







Among my treasures is the bisque cake topper from Howard Clayton and Katherine Marie Halderman Feyler's wedding that took place on 30 November 1918 in Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio.  It once had a dome to cover the bride and groom in period dress.  With the help of descriptive social page articles that announced the event I can envision the day.  It now is protected in the bow front cabinet in my living room. 


The bow front cabinet sat in the dining room of my grandparents on Gay Street when I was a child. It had gone thru the 1937 flood and was never refinished!  But with a few wood chips looks fine.  My mother said as the water receded they heard clanging and found a log moving back and forth hitting that glass.  It was not even cracked. My mother got it and took it to her home on Jomar in Ashland.  My parents brought it to me when we lived in Ohio.  As they moved it out the door a large table umbrella, propped up on the wall next to the door slid over and hit the glass.  Once again not even a chip to the glass.  I held my breath over the years with teen age boys thinking as the keeper of this wonderful piece I don’t want to be the one that damages the glass, after those stories!  Now my grandchildren peer thru the glass at the treasures.  Little hands leave finger prints that I hesitate to remove because it awes me that they are touching an item from their 2nd great grandparents that went thru the flood of all floods and survived!  My youngest son wants the cabinet and it will be his to continue the story.

A few years ago my husband carried my Ginny doll to an antique show; past many people and booths to have her restrung [I was unable to attend].  She is now whole again thanks to his time.  When I gaze at her I am transported back to a house long ago in Ashland, Kentucky and childhood memories come alive. I would sit cross legged in my tiny bedroom on Algonquin for hours dressing and redressing her. Mother taught me to take excellent care of any doll’s hair and today she looks like she did almost 60 years ago.

We have more valued treasures.  Hubby has his father's leather football helmet.  John Henry Klaiber played for a short time on an early Boyd County team.  We also have a picture of the team with him in helmet. 

Henry and Page Geer Martin's cherry gate leg table with several leaves hosted many family events. These included my great Grandmother Clara Geer until her death the year I was born in 1949, my father, uncle, cousins and friends.   Special events were documented with photographs.  My father was adamant that it be used in my house. It was a catalyst for his memories.  I am so thankful.  Now memories are being created around that table for a 6th generation and yes documented with photographs.

Will my descendants care about these physical items?  Will they have memories from sitting around our family table?   I hope so.


Estates are divided and sold.  Natural events destroy items.  But memories can be preserved.  Oral history pass stories and memories along.  Sometimes the stories are veiled by exuberant family members exaggerating to make the tale livelier as they are handed from generation to generation.   Not everyone can have the table but photographs can be digitized and shared so that each and every person in the family has a visual that will trigger their own memories. 

Just the other day I purchased a lot of books for winter reading.  I thought it was all novels until I found the priceless worn bible tucked among my reading material.  A beautiful story unfolded written in 1949. 

"Mrs. Joyce Stephens Feb 8, 1949 age 16. This bible was presented to me when I married Cecil M. Stephens. There was a $100.00 bill enclosed. My parents, Eva and Boyce McMillon gave all of us $100.00, if we did not smoke, drink alcohol nor coffe. I failed on the coffe. I used the $100.00 on supplies (lumber, etc) for our first home. Dad also gave us 2x4/s from his saw mill.  Trees were from the property on East Main (old Merritt property)."


Hubby and I could not let this wonderful bible story alone.  A little research showed that this lady lost her husband last year but was still living.  Obvious that after such a loss and cleaning out, the bible got lost in the shuffle.  I hit social media genealogy walls.  Within minutes I had 3 cousins from across the United States wanting that bible.  Within three days, one of the cousins, visiting from Florida was on my doorstep to retrieve it.  The joy of getting that bible back to family is beyond words or money. We never sell things like that even though we own a antique store Deliverance Farm Cabin Antiques.  We always try to get the item back to family members as a heart warming gift.

We are given the best device in the world to preserve memories.  The power of the written word.  Today we can combine that power with visual photography and sound bites.  Genealogy programs allow us to "attach" each digital item with the individual that once owned a physical item or was involved in the activity that created a special memory.

Yes, it is wonderful to have a physical item but so deeply sad if that item is fought over and family ties wounded. It is just stuff and we can't take it with us. But we can hold tightly to the memories.

09 October 2015

CORONERS BOYD COUNTY, KENTUCKY



Coroners
Boyd County, Kentucky

     Early coroners in Kentucky not only assisted with death by un-natural cause or violence but could process criminal and civil cases as well as make an arrest when necessary. Early records indicate that the coroner was appointed by the local court.   Today coroners are duly elected within each county.  They are considered constitutionally elected peace officers.  They are assisted by the Kentucky State Medical Examiners Office when necessary.  There is also a Kentucky Coroners Association providing a network for these elected officials.

     Coroners are required to submit reports to the circuit court on their findings but are not required to keep any particular record system.  Thus records can be vague, inconsistent or very brief when located at the county courthouse.  If a death certificate is marked delayed and the coroner signature appears it is wise for researchers to also check circuit court records for further investigation.

W. T. Hood, Boyd County Coroner 1870. On August 1870 Boyd County Court Orders show W. P. Hoods  appointment.  William Zachary Taylor Hood was born March 1848 the son of William P. and Matilda Howe Hood. He married Helen Davis the daughter of William Davis and Elizabeth McCroskey Davis 18 September 1875.  The Hoods lived on Sammons Fork of Garner on what was to become known as Poor House Road and at this writing is Long Branch Road. Hood did not complete medical college until 1884, in Cincinnati, Ohio. The family later moved to Peoria County, Illinois and later Sangamon County, Illinois. 

W. B. Porter. Boyd County Coroner 1874.  Failed to qualify and left a vacancy county then called and appointed him to fill the vacancy.  Dec 1874 order book 4 page 133

J. W. Martin 1882 Coroner     cited Order book 5 page 35-41 and 347


J. H. Wade 27 October 1890 resigned as Coroner of Boyd County. Order Book 6 page 309 and 346.

A. H. Moore, Boyd County Coroner 1900 -

Charles  R. Hunter, Boyd County Coroner 1921-1931.   In 1930 Dr. Hunter and his wife Eliza B., son Sylvester and daughter Mary V. were residing in Upper Ashland. Dr. Hunter died in June 1932 at Sandy Hook, Elliott County, Kentucky.

J. C. Hall, Boyd County Coroner 1931-[39 still listed]



Russell Compton, Boyd County Coroner 1956-1976.   Compton was a partner and funeral director for Kilgore and Collier Funeral Home, Catlettsburg, Kentucky.  Compton is retired and still lives in Boyd County, Kentucky.

C. Wayne Franz , Boyd County Coroner 1969-1976. Franz was born May 26, 1915 in Wurtland, Greenup County, Kentucky, the son of Theodore Benard and Nora Ann Fox Franz. During the Korean War he was a flight surgeon with the U. S. Air Force.  Franz married Audrey Elwanda Gussler 6 July 1940.  She was the daughter of Ova and Bessie Lyons Gussler. Franz had a private medical practice in Ashland, Kentucky for 30 years.  Franz is credited with establishing an emergency ambulance service in Ashland and was instrumental in the formation of the FIVCO District Health Department.  Franz was acting physician for the Gertrude Ramey Childrens Home for many years.  He served the balance of an unexpired term of Boyd County Coroner...


Philip Michael Neal, Boyd County Coroner 1976 -1998.  Prior to his appointment he acted as deputy coroner under Dr. C. Wayne Franz for seven years. Neal is owner of Neal Funeral Home and Kilgore & Collier Funeral Home located in Catlettsburg, Kentucky.  Mike and his wife Sandra have been active in missionary trips with Oakland Avenue Baptist Church, Catlettsburg.             



04 May 2015

KLAIBER CEMETERY




KLAIBER CEMETERY is a Kentucky Registered non-profit cemetery under KRS 367.932 (12).

James Klaiber, Teresa Klaiber, Craig Fannin Trustees
This article originally appeared at our web page www.deliverancefarm.com. This web page has been revised.  Several genealogy articles have been transferred to this blog for safe keeping. I will continue to maintain this blog as long as my health allows.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
While Boyd County, Kentucky was still in its infancy the James Howe family had quietly settled in a small house above Solomon's Fork, Sammons Branch (now Long Branch), of the East Fork of Garner. To the east of James Howe's 145 acres(1) and across Long Branch you could see the William Hood farm.

It was on the point, high on the hill of the William Hood farm, that James Howe laid to rest his small ward, the minor/infant daughter of deceased Allen Stewart, in October of 1871. Howe had been appointed tiny Isabelle Stewart's guardian in May of 1866.(2) It is possible that others may have been buried there prior to Isabelle's death, but hers is the earliest marked tombstone today (1996).

Some of the other families that settled in the area included Ross, Marcum, Prichard, Sexton, and Gallion. The Sexton's had moved to what was Carter County, later Boyd, from Letcher County, Kentucky, as had Hiram Gallion's wife Elizabeth Sutton Gallion. Gallion had been appointed to view a road (help survey) from the forks of Garner Creek to the Carter/Boyd County line, in December 1865.(3) Standing high on the hill of Hood's property, at the point just north of these early burials, one could see the makings of a road following the creek bed, just below.

As the road became a little more accessible, German immigrant John Andrew Klaiber, added to the network of families that worked and shared up and down the creek, purchasing the farm that could be viewed to the right of the cemetery.

In August 1874 William Hood died and was laid to rest on the hill of his farm, near Isabelle Stewart. Just two months earlier, their neighbor Sarah Howe had passed away and was given the Hoods blessing to be buried on The Hood property. Sarah was related to William's wife, Matilda. The Hood property changed hands several times before Henry Powell Sexton purchased it from George W. and Angelina Ross in 1885.(4)

H.P. and his wife Julina McCormack Sexton already had 11 children, the youngest named for her mother. His parents, Marcus and Catherine, lived over the hill in Lawrence County on Belle's Trace. Just three years after the Sexton's purchased the farm on Garner, Mark (as he was usually called) died.(5) The family had a team carry his body up the hill to the point that was quickly developing into a burial ground. Through the years the Sexton's held huge family reunions, and as they gathered in front of their large two story home, each could look across the road and up the hill at the pioneers who formed this area of the county. The Sexton's tenderly cared for the cemetery, eventually placing a small fence with a small entrance gate around the point. The family kept the area cleared and the Sexton ladies always made sure fresh flowers graced family graves.

The first known recorded entry of a grave yard was written 2 March 1893 when Henry Powell and wife Julina sold George Mayhew a 20 x 50 foot section "beginning at a post of the fence..." and "on a point nearly opposite the mansion house." The deed also states that William Mayhew was already buried there.(6)

The second recorded entry of a grave yard was filed in the Boyd County Recorder's Office on August 2, 1899.(7) H.P. Sexton sold John Andrew Klaiber one eighth of an acre for his family and heirs along with the "right of ingress and egress." This surveyed area was above the original fenced burial sites.

In 1905 Henry Powell Sexton's youngest daughter Julina, recently widowed, married John Andrew Klaiber's son James Matthew.(8) When H.P. died in 1913(9), widow Julina McCormack Sexton began the division of the property among her large family. These partition deeds carefully set apart 80 square yards for a grave yard. Daughter Julina and her husband, James Matthew Klaiber, continued the tradition of nurturing the cemetery. They instilled both the love of the land and the loving care of the cemetery in their son John Henry.

Among other early families migrating from Letcher County into Carter and Boyd County were Lucas'. The Lucas family were related to several branches of the Sexton family. When Lucinda Lucas, a daughter of James Henderson and Hulda Sexton died in 1931 she was buried in the cemetery. Two years later, in 1933 Lucinda's husband Henry Kane Lucas also died. The family requested a deed from Henry Powell's son, James M. Sexton, who's inherited portion included the cemetery. James M. and wife Etta had moved to Jasonville, Indiana and granted the deed for a plot, for $25.00. According to records the deed was not recorded until 1955 when improvements were being made at the grave yard.(10)

John Henry Klaiber had cared for the land that belonged to his parents, aunt's and uncles, as he grew up. By 1935(11) he had purchased land from his parents and in the Spring of 1937(12) began to buy relative's partitioned properties, recreating the original deed descriptions. This purchase of 43+ acres included the cemetery, though still described as 80 square yards, it had clearly grown. After J.H.'s marriage to Elsie Ellis Rucker they also purchased a large portion of land that had once been the James Howe farm.

From the vantage point of their newly acquired home, John and Elsie could also look up the hill and view the cemetery, where they soon laid to rest a tiny infant daughter. John Henry's life centered on family, farm, and community. And with community in mind, time after time, he gave another small piece of his land to bury those in need - the boundaries long since having spilled out of any legal description, onto his farmland. Those that wished could donate a little to mend the fence and those that could not afford the cost of burials were welcome. From time to time different individuals would help John Henry out, by mowing family area's of the cemetery. The neighborhood always came together, lovingly and with honor, carefully digging each new grave.

Through the early 1900's various death certificates, and deeds refer to the burial ground as the William Hood Cemetery, Garner Cemetery, Sexton Cemetery, and Klaiber Cemetery with variant spellings. Even today, the Kentucky Geological Survey, Rush Quadrangel map incorrectly spells the cemetery as "Clybur."

The last team to carry a casket to the cemetery was on a cold, snowy Christmas Day, 1949, when a horse drawn sled took J.H.'s father, James Matthew Klaiber up the hill. (13)
His widow, Julina, was determined that a good road was needed for hearse, friends, and family members. In 1955 she wrote letter after letter, asking for donations to build a new road and to refence the cemetery. Family descendants were scattered but letters and donations came in from Gallion and
Enyart families, the Workman's, Sexton's, Klaiber's, Fannin's, and others. The improvements were completed in 1956.(14)(15)(16)

John Henry continued care of the cemetery, road and fence. Small donations came in from various branch's of families through the years. For some time before her death, Amanda Maddox collected for the Lucas family. After her death Harold Sexton continued to manage Lucas and Sexton donations. John, his wife Elsie, and sister Martha, collected from Klaiber family and friends. In the early 1990's, because of ill health it became necessary for John and Harold to share the expense of hiring someone to mow when funds were low. John Henry Klaiber died June 18, 1995, Father's Day, on the farm that he loved, with his family, and wonderful neighbors that dearly cared for him. He is buried beside his wife, and near daughter, parents, grandparents and great grandparents, neighbors, and pioneers.

The farm has now passed to son James David Klaiber. As a tribute to father, family, and community, a Cemetery Fund has been established in a local Boyd County bank with a goal of perpetual funding in the future. The Klaiber's will continue to care for the cemetery. Jim and family have lived away for over 20 years but it is so easy to be drawn back when roots run so deeply and Boyd County has always been "home." It is easier still to honor and care for the last earthly resting place of those with such a rich history of the county we love. And it is a wonderful feeling knowing that this is where one belongs.

Records show, financially, outside donations were never enough to handle fence repairs, gravel, mower repairs, gasoline, gates, and other necessities. Folks chuckled at the mailbox, J.H. mounted by the gate to accept small donations. He joked that maybe someone that lived there would win the Publishers Clearing House. A book KLAIBER CEMETERY was produced in 1996 to generate funds for the savings account located at Kentucky Farmers Bank, Catlettsburg, KY. The book generated almost $2000.00. But funds are still needed to care for fence, road and the future of our cemetery. If you would like to donate to the cemetery you can do so by sending a check payable to "Klaiber Cemetery Fund," 22937 Long Branch Road, Rush, KY 41168.

The area of what is known as Klaiber Cemetery is full. Those area's that do not yet hold loved ones, are reserved.


KLAIBER CEMETERY, BOYD COUNTY, KY

 
LASTGIVENBIRTHDEATHSTONE
BLACKBURNKERMIT30 DEC 191420 JUNE 200342
BLACKBURNWILMA M16 NOV 1928
42
BLAIRFAMILY PLOT


BOCOOKSANFORD
9 DEC 191084
CLARKJOHN T9 OCT 184815 JUL 191510
CLARKJOSEPH M24 JUL 18604 AUG 191511
CLARKMITCHELL7 MAY 181914 SEP 18928
CLARKSARAH R1 MAR 18233 OCT 19029
COMBSLEWIS1900192380
COMBSMARTHA1851193079
CONLEYDORIS ENYART1954199328
CONLEYGLADYS SEXTON

100
COXFRED RAYMOND18 AP 19001 JUL 196453
CRUMJOHN ALLEN

5
CRUMMAGGIE

5
CRUMWISE

6
DOWDYSARAH CRABTREE1903197187
DOWDYTHOMAS2 MAR 189529 AP 196987
DURHAMFREDERICK H7 JUN 18914 FEB 197386
DURHAMSARAH C4 DEC 18937 JULY 198386
ENYARTCURTIS


ENYARTDOUGLAS


ENYARTLEONARD L1888197544
ENYARTMARY E1921198943
ENYARTMARY G1894197344
ENYARTTOM191426 JUL 200043
ESTEP


66
FANNINMARY E
31 JAN 189954
FELTYDEBRA1953199899
FERRELHELEN

76
FERRELRAYMOND1921199576
FUGATEDAVID WAYNE29 AP 196527 OCT 196630
GALLIONCLARENCE

11
GALLIONEMA

11
GALLIONGOLDIE28 MAR 189630 APR 189637
GALLIONH. D.14 FEB 18272 NOV 189013
GALLIONINFANT

11
GALLIONWILLIAM H1855192012
GUSSLERWILLARD SCOTT1912198288
HARRISJOHN H2 MAR 186011 MAR 190922
HATFIELD


86
HATFIELDEMMETT

86
HOODMATILDA3 DEC 180520 MAR 188757
HOODWILLIAM P
14 AUG 197456
HOWESARAH
6 JUN 18747
HUNDBETH FANNIN

101
HUNDEDWARD

102
JARVISEMRALD18 SEP 19076 MAR 196877
JARVISLAURA5 SEP 191031 DEC 194277
JONESARTHUR L1941194427
JONESCHARLES1928194327
JORDANDELLA C28 JUN 193030 AUG 193096
JORDANG. W.
20 APR 193093
JORDANH. B.10 DEC 190630 JUL 193196
JORDANIRA VERNON4 FEB 190127 APR 193390
JORDANMARY E1870194097
JORDANMARY JANE26 MAY 187424 APR 193692
JORDANTHOMAS P1871195197
KELLEYE ALICE1868189634
KELLYELIZA O
18 NOV 189560
KLAIBERELSIE R7 JAN 191224 NOV 198732
KLAIBERINFANT
194531
KLAIBERJAMES DAVID

32
KLAIBERJAMES DAVID


KLAIBERJAMES MATTHEW21 JUL 185822 DEC 194967
KLAIBERJOHN ANDREW20 OCT 18314 Dec 192051
KLAIBERJOHN H15 JUL 191118 JUNE32
KLAIBERJULINA HORTON30 JUNE 187720 APR 197867
KLAIBERMARGURETTA
14 SEP 189668
KLAIBERMARY ANN MCBRAYER24 MAY 18341 APR 191951
KLAIBERMARY MONTGOMERY22 JAN 18799 AUG 191233
KLAIBERN. A.24 SEP 186128 SEP 190452
KLAIBERTERESA LYNN MARTIN

32
LAWRENCEJOHNNY

27
LAWRENCERUBY ENYART

27
LAWSON


63
LAWSON


63
LAWSON


63
LUCASBESSIE J1926196672
LUCASCARL D1918191874
LUCASCHARLEY24 MAY 190522 AUG 192594
LUCASELIZABETH22 MAY 191227 NOV 198969
LUCASFRANK K1884196671
LUCASGARNER

78
LUCASH. K.1846193370
LUCASLUCINDA1850193170
LUCASMARTHA E1919192373
LUCASNANCY A1888196771
LUCASRALPH C14 MAR 191416 JUL 197769
LUCASSHERMAN

34
LUCASTAYLOR

34
LUCASVIRGINIA MYRTLE24 SEP 192429 JUL 192678
MADDOXAMANDA M1908
76
MADDOXARLIE18 MAY 192118 AUG 197889
MADDOXTHOMAS J1895196076
MAYHEWDIMMA2 JUN 18679 APR 189524
MAYHEWFLORA S


MAYHEWMARY E21 SEP 18348 SEP 190426
MAYHEWWILLIAM C2 NOV 19323 MAY 189025
MCCORMICKJACKIE RAY11 MAR 193911 MAR 19391
MOOREJ. L.21 JAN 192520 NOV 199964
MOOREREBECCA J15 MAR 1937
64
REEVESCHARLES EDWARD

95
REEVESLULA M1894195595
SEXTONCATHERINE
7 JUN 189317
SEXTONERNEST O20 MAR 192010 JAN 198639
SEXTONEVERET8 JAN 190517 JUN 190585
SEXTONFRANK6 MAR 190422 JAN 193529
SEXTONHAROLD

98
SEXTONHENRY POWELL1892197438
SEXTONHOPIE M9 MAR 191030 JUN 193082
SEXTONHOWARD1 MAY 192220 JUN 200262
SEXTONJASPER N15 JAN 186910 NOV 196783
SEXTONKENNETH "HOP"1926198981
SEXTONKENNETH E25 NOV 192619 OCT 198975
SEXTONMARIAM L1 APR 187817 MAR 193083
SEXTONMARK2 JAN 181222 OCT 187716
SEXTONNELLIE G1898196238
SEXTONr NORMAN30 NOV 18998 NOV 192184
SEXTONWILLA


SEXTONWIRT ELAM18 JUL 19184 NOV 199783
SHEPHERDDORIS25 AUG 195325 AUG 200063
SHEPHERDJOHN

63
SHEPHERDWILLIAM R10 JAN 194111 OCT 197048
SMITHCLYDE JR11 JUL 192723 MAR 193065
SMITHCYNTHIA1901199464
SMITHJAMES RICHARD21 DEC 192425 JUN 198864
SMITHLEWIS DEWEY5 MAR 18999 OCT 197764
SPARKS



SPARKSDAVE1898196646
SPARKSFRANKLIN D20 MAR 194223 FEB 196945
SPARKSNORA20 JUL 1902
46
STANLEYCLARENCE24 MAR 19228 JUN 196661
STANLEYDWIGHT M29 AUG 188414 SEP 190441
STANLEYGEORGE J28 JUL 189519 DEC 197361
STANLEYJ. B.31 MAR 185825 OCT 193940
STANLEYJOE1890194062
STANLEYMARGARET E7 SEP 189530 JAN 196161
STANLEYMYRTLE1892198162
STANLEYSUSAN18 MAR 185630 OCT 190840
STEWARTISABELLA A
23 OCT 187155
STEWARTPAULINE11 nOV 192223 SEP 200277
UNKNOWN


35
UNKNOWN


59
UNKNOWN


58
UNKNOWN


36
UNKNOWN


18
UNKNOWN


21
UNKNOWN


19
UNKNOWN


15
UNKNOWN


14
UNKNOWN


23
UNKNOWN


20
VANNATTERBERT7 MAR 1917
49
VANNATTERDOROTHY22 JUN 19249 MAR 198449
VANNATTERGARY EDWARD18 FEB 194123 JUN 196847
VANNATTERWILLIAM LEONARD23 JUN 194224 DEC 197050
WOOTENBEATRICE3 JUN 18971 APR 19503
WOOTENEVERETT189019732
WOOTENJ. C.19 JUN 191827 SEP 19204
WORKMANINES21 APR 190012 OCT 193391
WORKMANINFANT

91
WRIGHTGENE C

76
WRIGHTJOAN

76